Charlotte Bracegirdle

Charlotte Bracegirdle's Blog.
My art, other art and some great images.
blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  The Public Art Fund has installed these "artificial clouds",  by Swiss New Yorker Olaf Breuning, near the southeast entrance to Central Park. I love the way their false cheeriness seems utterly unsuited to the grit of New York, while at the same time their clumsy artifice seems perfectly Broadway. There’s also a lovely sense that these flat clouds have been painted on top of the cityscape, which meshes with the feeling one often has of New York as a picture of itself.
And one last, peculiar observation: In Western art, a forest of uprights with nailed-on crosspieces always evokes old paintings of Christ and the two thieves crucified on Golgotha. I don’t know what to do with that evocation, except to note that suffering has been replaced by cheery weather. (Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures; photo by Liz Ligon, Courtesy Public Art Fund, NY)
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  The Public Art Fund has installed these "artificial clouds",  by Swiss New Yorker Olaf Breuning, near the southeast entrance to Central Park. I love the way their false cheeriness seems utterly unsuited to the grit of New York, while at the same time their clumsy artifice seems perfectly Broadway. There’s also a lovely sense that these flat clouds have been painted on top of the cityscape, which meshes with the feeling one often has of New York as a picture of itself.

And one last, peculiar observation: In Western art, a forest of uprights with nailed-on crosspieces always evokes old paintings of Christ and the two thieves crucified on Golgotha. I don’t know what to do with that evocation, except to note that suffering has been replaced by cheery weather. (Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures; photo by Liz Ligon, Courtesy Public Art Fund, NY)

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

Two Lawrence’s, from the series 100 Great Writers, 2014

Two Lawrence’s, from the series 100 Great Writers, 2014

From the series: Neighbors by Arne Svenson

From the series: Neighbors by Arne Svenson

Your Thievin’ Art? At Play in the Field of Fair Use

Your mug shot. Your profile picture. Your breakfast table. Is anything safe from appropriation artists?

On Saturday Julie Saul opens a show of work by Arne Svenson, an artist with a telephoto lens, a formalist’s eye, and a somewhat unsettling obsession with his neighbors in the glass-walled apartment building across the street.

You can meet them, too, in the color pictures in “The Neighbors.”

Obscured yet often recognizable, the figures lounge around as one does at home when no one is looking, half awake or half dressed. Yet aided by curtains and window frames, they resolve themselves into ordered compositions, their mysterious narratives coalescing where Vermeer meets Rear Window via the Pictures Generation.

According to the artist, the neighbors are fair game because they’re  making public art: “performing behind a transparent scrim on a stage of their own creation with the curtain raised high,” as his statement puts it.

Assuming that the Neighbors really are neighbors—and not conjured in the studio, or the computer—the work falls into one of those gray areas of Fair Use, the legal doctrine that allows artists to use images of or by others under certain circumstances. Even if this is legal, is it ethical? Isn’t any place safe from prying cameras? Are there times when Fair Use just isn’t fair?

Neighbors #1, 2012 by Arne Svenson

Neighbors #1, 2012 by Arne Svenson

When Is Appropriation Just Copying?

Artist Jason Levesque was down in Miami last week, wandering around Scope art fair, when he noticed something: work by an artist named Josafat Miranda that looked exactly like his own. Miranda had taken photographs shot by Levesque years ago and painted them nearly to a tee — recreations with added color and flair. He had done the same thing with some photos shot by Marie Killen. Miranda’s pieces were being sold for $4,000 a piece at a gallery booth at Scope.

Levesque didn’t say anything at the time, but a few days later, he lined up the pairs of images side by side and posted about it on Tumblr. The post went viral,newspapers picked up the story, and the repercussions for Miranda were swift: within days, Robert Fontaine Gallery had pulled his work, canceled his pending sales, dropped him from its roster, and denounced him.

'Gibbons' from the series '100Great Writers'. 2013

'Gibbons' from the series '100Great Writers'. 2013

It’s been a while but after one little boy and a some months getting used to being a mum I am now back to work.
'Fitzgerald, Kavanagh and Bulgakov', from the series '100 Great Writer' 2013.

It’s been a while but after one little boy and a some months getting used to being a mum I am now back to work.

'Fitzgerald, Kavanagh and Bulgakov', from the series '100 Great Writer' 2013.

Richard Prince wins next round of copyright battle

Richard Prince scored an important win at the Second Circuit Court of Appeal against photographer Patrick Cariou yesterday. And it could have big implications for artists who appropriate artistic work that’s gone before.

As you may know, Cariou had successfully sued Prince for copyright infringement, claiming that the artist appropriated his copyrighted photos of Rastafarians taken in Jamaica for a 2000 book, Yes Rasta. Prince had admitted taking the work, altering and incorporating the photos into a series of paintings and collages which he called Canal Zone. These were exhibited in 2007 and 2008 at the Gagosian in New York. In 2011 a judge ruled that Prince’s work inappropriately borrowed from Cariou’s.

At a lower court, Cariou had been successful in his case against the artist. Yesterday, however, the Second Circuit reversed the decision in part with  judges finding that 25 of the 30 Prince works in questions are indeed fair use. A lower court judge will determine the remaining five. 

According to Second Circuit circuit judge Barrington Parker’s decision, “What is critical is how the work in question appears to the reasonable observer, not simply what an artist might say about a particular piece or body of work. Prince’s work could be transformative even without commenting on Cariou’s work or on culture, and even without Prince’s stated intention to do so.” You can read a bit more about that intricacies  in the court documents which you can read in full here.

"These twenty-five of Prince’s artworks manifest an entirely different aesthetic from Cariou’s photographs," writes Judge Parker. "Where Cariou’s serene and deliberately composed portraits and landscape photographs depict the natural beauty of Rastafarians and their surrounding environs, Prince’s crude and jarring works, on the other hand, are hectic and provocative."

The judge also notes that Cariou used black-and-white while Prince created collages, incorporated colour, and made other distortions. ”Prince’s composition, presentation, scale, colour palette, and media are fundamentally different and new compared to the photographs, as is the expressive nature of Prince’s work.” Despite what seemed like Prince’s initial reluctance to argue the transformative nature of his work as forcefully as one might perhaps expect, the appeals court came down on that side anyway.

"Here, looking at the artworks and the photographs side-by-side, we conclude that Prince’s images have a different character, give Cariou’s photographs a new expression, and employ new aesthetics with creative and communicative results distinct from Cariou’s. Our conclusion should not be taken to suggest, however, that any cosmetic changes to the photographs would necessarily constitute fair use. A secondary work may modify the original without being transformative. For instance, a derivative work that merely presents the same material but in a new form, such as a book of synopses of televisions shows, is not transformative."

Of the remaining five images, Judge Parker says, “Although the minimal alterations that Prince made in those instances moved the work in a different direction from Cariou’s classical portrature and landscape photos, we can not say with certainty at this point whether those artworks present a ‘new expression, meaning, or message.’” That judgement - when it comes - will prove crucial in  giving judge’s any future guidance on determining what’s transformative and what is not.