Charlotte Bracegirdle

Charlotte Bracegirdle's Blog.
My art, other art and some great images.
periodicult:

Rifat Ozbek, American Vogue, September 1987. Photograph by Steven Meisel.

periodicult:

Rifat Ozbek, American Vogue, September 1987. Photograph by Steven Meisel.

(via lushlight)

Four Kafka’s, from the series 100 Great Writers.
Just a sketch at the moment, working on the final piece.

Four Kafka’s, from the series 100 Great Writers.

Just a sketch at the moment, working on the final piece.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  The Public Art Fund has installed these "artificial clouds",  by Swiss New Yorker Olaf Breuning, near the southeast entrance to Central Park. I love the way their false cheeriness seems utterly unsuited to the grit of New York, while at the same time their clumsy artifice seems perfectly Broadway. There’s also a lovely sense that these flat clouds have been painted on top of the cityscape, which meshes with the feeling one often has of New York as a picture of itself.
And one last, peculiar observation: In Western art, a forest of uprights with nailed-on crosspieces always evokes old paintings of Christ and the two thieves crucified on Golgotha. I don’t know what to do with that evocation, except to note that suffering has been replaced by cheery weather. (Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures; photo by Liz Ligon, Courtesy Public Art Fund, NY)
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  The Public Art Fund has installed these "artificial clouds",  by Swiss New Yorker Olaf Breuning, near the southeast entrance to Central Park. I love the way their false cheeriness seems utterly unsuited to the grit of New York, while at the same time their clumsy artifice seems perfectly Broadway. There’s also a lovely sense that these flat clouds have been painted on top of the cityscape, which meshes with the feeling one often has of New York as a picture of itself.

And one last, peculiar observation: In Western art, a forest of uprights with nailed-on crosspieces always evokes old paintings of Christ and the two thieves crucified on Golgotha. I don’t know what to do with that evocation, except to note that suffering has been replaced by cheery weather. (Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures; photo by Liz Ligon, Courtesy Public Art Fund, NY)

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.